TODAY'S NEWS - QUICKIES THAT CHANGE OFTEN

"I WILL NOT FOLLOW WHERE THE PATH MAY LEAD, BUT I WILL GO WHERE THERE IS NO PATH, AND I WILL LEAVE A TRAIL." Muriel Strode -KHS65 class motto.
"The good old days....when we weren't good and we weren't old" Barbara Schwarz Moss 2010
SEE WWW.KHS65.COM FOR 169 PIX FROM OUR 45TH REUNION - CLICK THE SMALL PHOTO FOR LARGER VERSION. See lots of NEW grade school pix!
CHECK THE LABELS, GO TO KIRKWOOD HISTORY ARTICLES & CLICK THE POST ABOUT FRANCIS SCHEIDEGGER'S PIX FOR A GLIMPSE OF A PLACE I BET EVERYONE REMEMBERS - and much more!


MICK MARIETTA IS IN A NURSING HOME WHERE HE WILL REMAIN FOR THE REST OF HIS LIFE AFTER A STROKE. HE WOULD ENJOY PHONE CALLS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD FRIENDS TO CHEER HIM UP. His number is 573 885-4500, ask for Mick Marietta. It may be difficult to communicate with him. Mail address is Cuba Manor, 210 Eldon Drive, Cuba, MO 65453.


We seem to all be suffering a common problem these days, WHERE DID OUR LIVES GO? Our brains seem to still be 18, but our bodies are talking a different language. Sarah Orne Jewett puts it much more eloquently than do I:

“Neither of my companions was troubled by her burden of years. I hoped in my heart that I might be like them as I lived on into age, and then smiled to think that I too was no longer very young. So we always keep the same hearts, though our outer framework fails and shows the touch of time.”

FOR LATEST NEWS BE SURE TO CHECK OUT KHS65 AT FACEBOOK TOO!


Interactive news, reviews, gossip, musings, activities, photos, mysteries, histories, stories, truths, lies & video tapes from & for graduates of the Kirkwood (MO) High School fabulous class of 1965. Email us anything you would like to share to leslieatkhs65dotcom. See photos at www.khs65.com - comment here or on the website to make yourself heard! FIND US ~ www.khs65.com ~ www.khs65.org ~ FACEBOOK KHS65 ~ http://khs65blog.com ~ KHS65 MAKE IT A HABIT!

Thursday, May 7, 2009

BITS & PIECES OF KIRKWOOD HISTORY

Funeral of Oldest Kirkwood Citizen Extracted from the St. Louis County Watchman, 12 February 1926 Submitted by Special Collections, St. Louis County Library
The following article is transcribed exactly
as it originally appeared in the St. Louis County Watchman.

Luther Armstrong, 88, Had Occupied the Same House - There for 81 Years.
——
From the oldest house in Kirkwood, to the oldest church of Kirkwood, was taken yesterday
the body of Kirkwood’s oldest citizen, Luther Armstrong, 88 years old, retired florist, who died
Wednesday of the infirmities of age in the house he had occupied 81 years. He will be buried this
afternoon, with services in Rock Hill Presbyterian Church, which his father helped to build in 1845, and interment in Oak Hill Cemetery. Mr. Armstrong was 7 years old when his father,
Clinton Armstrong, came from Rogersville, Ky., with his wife and 9 children, in a wagon
train. They bought the 8-room house at what is now 700 Collins Road, and the surrounding
farm for $15 an acre. The house, built of huge logs and framed with wide boards nailed upright,
was erected in 1808 by Mrs. Jane Yeats. There was one other house in the Kirkwood district, the
Bodley home, three miles away, but it has been replaced. Today the Armstrong homestead has dwindled to 12 acres and the house stands back from
the road hidden in a grove of large, old shade trees. A telephone, a radio and a phonograph can
be found within, but coal oil lamps and stoves are used and water is carried 50 yards from a well
dug by Clinton Armstrong. Luther Armstrong’s widow, Emma, and a daughter, Miss Julia Armstrong, now occupy the house. In the front yard is the stump of a broad ailanthus
tree which tradition says sprung from a stick which Clinton Armstrong had whittled for a cane
in Tennessee and thrust into the ground on his arrival in St. Louis County. Armstrong brought
several slaves with him when he migrated and freed them in 1847. Luther, the tenth of 13 children, was sent to Amherst College and served in the Union Army through the Civil War.
After the war, young Armstrong returned to Kirkwood and became a florist. He built hothouses
near the residence and later opened a floral shop at Spring Avenue and Olive Street, in St.
Louis, which he abandoned 20 years ago because of failing health. He refused to permit electric
lights or plumbing in the house and employed several servants to do the housework in the old
manner. Two sons grew to manhood and departed. One son, L. H. Armstrong, now lives in Berkeley, Cal., and the other, H. H. Armstrong, in Hartford, Conn.
In the house are found broad stone fireplaces with high mantels. There is an old inlaid cherrywood chest of drawers which Mrs. Clinton Armstrong received as a wedding gift in 1816. A
bookcase of the same period is still in use. The building is in good repair and evidently has many
years of usefulness before it. Outside it is painted white, with a sloping shingled roof, and two massive stone chimneys, one at each end, are thickly grown with ivy.
###
St. Louis County Watchman, St. Louis
County, 12 February 1926, page 5. Submitted by
Special Collections, St. Louis County Library.
Reprinted with permission of the St. Louis County
Watchman Advocate.
Wonder what Collins Avenue is now and if this house still stands. Anyone wanting a research project, this could be a fun one! Let me know & I can give you some hints on where to start. LVC

No comments:

Post a Comment